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Sunday, December 23, 2007

The Mitchell Report does not state what NY Times implies--sorry

DON'T TAKE THEIR CALLS, JOE TORRE. If A LIE is repteated OFTEN ENOUGH, PEOPLE START BELIEVING IT'S TRUE AND IT'S NOT. Again, the media portrays the 2000 Yankee team as fraudulent. But I just did all the checking, using the report, and it only supports 1 Yankee using during the 2000 season--Roger Clemens. And on Neagle: Murray Chass: "Neagle played for the Yankees in the latter half of that season and, according to Mitchell, used human growth hormone."
  • THE MITCHELL REPORT DOES NOT SAY NEAGLE USED HGH IN THE LATTER HALF OF 2000 AS CHASS IMPLIES HERE. IT SAYS HE PLAYED FOR THE YANKEES, HE SUBSEQUENTLY MET RADOMSKI AT A CLUB, AT SOME POINT IN THE FUTURE HE BECAME A CLIENT AND ALWAYS PAID BY CHECK. THE PHOTOCOPIES OF ALL THE CHECKS ARE IN THE APPENDIX OF THE MITCHELL REPORT ON PP389 AND 390 FROM NEAGLE AND NONE ARE WRITTEN BEFORE 2001. FIRST YOU SAY WE'RE SUPPOSED TO BELIEVE THE REPORT, THEN YOU SAY WE'RE SUPPOSED TO ADD OUR OWN IMAGINATION TO IT.
Chass must have at least looked at the 2000 World Series itself and found out that Neagle did practically nothing, so he focuses on his few outings at the latter half of the 2000 regular season, imagining that the Red Sox might've gone to the World Series had it not been for Denny Neagle and Roger Clemens and their drugs. Again, Chass has left the reader to assume Neagle was on drugs at that time. According to the Mitchell report which was supposedly so great, there is no check written by Neagle until sometime in 2001. (I wonder if anyone at the NY Times imagines Paul Byrd "stole" Game 4 of the ALDS from the Yankees? No, I didn't think so). sm

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